Genomics of COVID-19 Vaccine-Induced Adverse Events

The Genomics of COVID-19 Vaccine-Induced Adverse Events project is one of the Global COVID Vaccine Safety (GCoVS) project* activities. The GCoVS project affords a unique opportunity to examine genetic contribution towards vaccine-induced adverse events. Genetic contributions to serious and life-threatening drug reactions have seen genetic information incorporated into 800 drug labels worldwide by regulators. Genomic investigations are likely to inform who is at risk of a specific adverse event as well as lead to a better understanding of the biological or pathophysiological basis of adverse events.

The Genomics of COVID-19  Vaccine-Induced Adverse Events project is being led by Dr Bruce Carleton and is focused on three adverse events that have been reported globally following COVID-19 vaccination, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT)/ thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) and myocarditis and/or pericarditis. Participants are being sought from around the world and can self-refer.

People interested in contributing a saliva sample for DNA analysis and/or researchers interested in collaborating in this study, please contact Dr Bruce Carleton by email for further information, bcarleton@popi.ubc.ca. An overview of the project methodology is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Overview of genomics project methodology

Figure 1 Overview of genomics project methodology

 

Dr Carleton is the:

  • Lead for the GVDN Global COVID Vaccine Safety (GCoVS) project genomics protocol work group
  • Professor and Chair, Division of Translational Therapeutics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, The University of British Columbia, Canada 
  • Senior Clinician Scientist, BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Canada
  • Director, Pharmaceutical Outcomes Programme, BC Children’s Hospital, Canada 
  • Director, Therapeutic Evaluation Unit, Provincial Health Services Authority, Canada 

 

*This project is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totalling US$5,643,515 with 100% percentage funded by CDC/HHS. The contents are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CDC/HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit cdc.gov.